S- This party's gettin' CRAZY, yeah!

irresponsible queuing ahead

5 notes

fireemblem7x:

Our FEE3 video is here!

MageKnight404 is playing through Chapter 7 here, which is something of a doozy. It marks a dramatic shift in difficulty from the earlygame to the midgame stages, which will continue to escalate up towards Chapter 12, the Part One finale.

Obviously there are still some changes that need to be made (whoops multiple crashes), and some content that hasn’t been implemented (Uriel’s mini-portrait, supports, etc), but in all I feel that things went well. This chapter will be playable for the public in our next release, which I will talk about in the next progress report. Until then!

3 notes

Welcome!

fireemblem7x:

This blog is still under construction, but here you will find regular updates on our project, Fire Emblem: Immortal Sword. Click through to the website for more details if you are unfamiliar with our work.

The short version is that our team (BwdYeti, founder and lead developer; Myke (that’s me!!!), lead writer and designer; Merc, Aeorys Kirru, Vampire Elf, Kitsu, Ragnarok, and Dei Enyt, character artists; Feaw and Kitty of Time, environment artists; ArcSage and Rewjeo, musicians) are working on a fan-made prequel to Fire Emblem 7: Blazing Sword. The game is developed in a custom-made XNA engine and does not require an emulator to play - although it currently does require the user to be running a windows operating system.

We’re now coming into the final stages of development and thought it would be a good idea to keep our fans up-to-date on the latest developments on a more regular basis. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter if you prefer those platforms, as everything posted here will be linked on those pages. The Progress Reports (previously hosted on our forums) will also be posted here from now on.

Watch this space! I’ll be posting soon about FEE3 and our showcase for it.

FE7x on tumblr! Go follow!

!!!!!!!

86,595 notes

kaon4shi:

alwaysenduphere:

Le génie du mal [The genius of evil, aka; Lucifer]; Guillaume Geefs 

“The statue was originally a commission for Geefs’ younger brother Joseph, who completed it in 1842 and installed it the following year. It generated controversy at once and was criticized for not representing a Christian ideal.The cathedral administration declared that “this devil is too sublime.” The local press intimated that the work was distracting the “pretty penitent girls” who should have been listening to the sermons.” [x]

[The original ‘sublime’ version shown below, and the ‘revised’ one in the photoset above]

image

> Make sculpture of the devil

> No this sculpture is too hot for church

> Make another one

> It’s even hotter

(via catgoboom)

56,358 notes

jumpingjacktrash:

peoplemask:

queendecuisine:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn

OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).
ANYWAY.
Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.
On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.
Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.
After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.
Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.
And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS IS THE MAN.

I like the original link in the OP, because it quotes someone saying there should be a movie about Robert Smalls.
I wish. I would watch the hell out of that.

there should totally be a movie, that would be awesome.
btw, getting kinda tired of people reblogging these didyouknowblog posts and going THIS PERSON HAS A NAME YOU KNOW as if names are left out of the teaser posts out of contempt or carelessness. it’s a teaser post. it’s meant to make you go look at the link and read the whole story. if they put details in the teaser, people would instinctively think that was the whole story and would be less likely to click through.
ps please do click through, there is a lot more to the story than was added in that reblog.

jumpingjacktrash:

peoplemask:

queendecuisine:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn


OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).

ANYWAY.

Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.

On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.

Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.

After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.

Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.

And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS IS THE MAN.

I like the original link in the OP, because it quotes someone saying there should be a movie about Robert Smalls.

I wish. I would watch the hell out of that.

there should totally be a movie, that would be awesome.

btw, getting kinda tired of people reblogging these didyouknowblog posts and going THIS PERSON HAS A NAME YOU KNOW as if names are left out of the teaser posts out of contempt or carelessness. it’s a teaser post. it’s meant to make you go look at the link and read the whole story. if they put details in the teaser, people would instinctively think that was the whole story and would be less likely to click through.

ps please do click through, there is a lot more to the story than was added in that reblog.

(via roachpatrol)